Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Hi Steve. I appreciate your feedback.  :)

Sure, I've made assumptions. And I agree with you, (paraphrasing) a live event is best. But that's kind of my point. When you're at a live event, especially acoustic, you're likely to hear many unamplified sounds. In this context unamplified means the sound didn't first pass through a microphone. Once the sound passes through a mic, there is some degree of loss that has already occurred. You can't make up for what has been lost by playing back a recorded version of it.

To your other point, the fact that certain gear is somehow "revered" relative to other gear is, in my opinion, just part of the human condition where we somehow think that "normality" (in this example what it is that's being revered) is correct. Rather, normality is merely what the majority of the 8 billion of us humans do, think, etc.

Here's an analogy. What does science tell us that normal human body temperature is? Answer, 98.6F. Now, is that *everybody's* temperature *all the time*. Certainly not. Big variables plus/minus perhaps as much as 3 degrees.

"All of audiophilia is a search for the perfect distortion profile."
- Jason Stoddard

Yes, I've been able to find better gear over time, experimentation, etc. But that's merely my subjective opinion. Audio gear usually can be measured objectively. Once objectivity is brought to bear, I find it interesting that (usually, of course there are exceptions) most folks tend to like the sound of gear that measures *worse*, and dislike the sound of gear that measures *better*.

Add to that that once someone convinces themselves that something *is* better, as soon as blind or double blind testing is used, said individual becomes rather less convinced.

And yes, Steve. We can agree that we both like live music. :J
2
Bipolar System Disorders / Re: what’s your philosophy of voicing a system?
« Last post by steve on December 07, 2022, 07:33:04 PM »
Beyond one's own hearing acuity, I think a valid argument can be made that no microphone is "exactly perfect". So, it follows that the expectation level of playing back sound(s) that have been recorded can also never be exactly perfect, no matter the room, speaker, electronics or anything else. Yes, the pursuit of audio nirvana is very alluring, especially when you love music.

The only truth is music….Music blends with the heartbeat universe and we forget the brain beat. - Jack Kerouac

To stay on point with this thread topic, I can tell when a system is voiced properly not just because of what my ears are transmitting to my brain, but by how/if my head is bobbing, my toes are tapping, or if I'm "moved" to dance and/or sing along.

At some point, "better" gear just doesn't do that. Only more music.

Many years ago I changed my listening habits, primarily because I'm the proverbial "deadhead". When I first started listening to Grateful Dead (80's) I couldn't understand what all the fuss over "different versions" of the same song, albeit performed on a different date and at a different venue, was all about. But at some point, it just "hit me". And as Bob Marley sings, this is the one good thing about music; when it hits you feel no pain.

So then I started "collecting" (90's) all Grateful Dead music I could get my hands (ears) on. Not long after listening to GD constantly, I realized that approximately half the songs they ever performed live, are cover songs (i.e. they are not the original composer). Then, I started listening to those artists, and my overall appreciation of music and artistic talent became greater and greater. Sure, like all of us, I started listening to music as a child. And many of those artists are still "with me" today, in mind, spirit, and on my hard drives! If I listen to song I  heard essentially in my infancy, like something from The Beatles, it's rather simple to know if my system - or someone else's - is "voiced" correctly.

These days I make it a point to always listen to something different. Hence this is one reason why I collect and listen to "live" music recordings. After I've listened to a studio album once, I just don't get the same enjoyment factor if I were to listen to it again. But that's just me.

Many audiophiles desire to constantly change their gear, or "something" about their system. I do not operate that way. Unless something is obviously wrong, I can stay content with my system for many years. Sure, I might tweak something here or there, but the dominant variable is the music itself.

Changing gear doesn't necessarily make anything sound better. More often than not it boils down to "different", not "better" or "worse".

Well, the aforementioned is my philosophy anyway.

Best.

Hal

Hi Hal,

I appreciate you views, although I saw several assumptions made. Of course you understand
that assumptions are about as valid as speculations.
I take it you have not been able to find anything better than what components you have now,
just different? I am glad you are happy with your system. One of the joys of life is listening to
good music. Being at the venue of the Vienna or Berlin Orchestras without being there is one
of the great joys of my work. I love live music.

I have some comments etc if I may.

1. Personally, I would like to be as close to the live event/experience as possible in sound
reproduction at home. I never get tired of playing my favorites over and over. Good music
reaches one's heart and soul.

2. "At some point, "better" gear just doesn't do that. Only more music." There appears 
to be an assumption that nothing is better, just different. Better, live is not as good?
I am wondering if you are, like many people, believing that expensive must be better?
Nothing could be further from the truth.

3. Being "voiced correctly" is a relative term. I have heard a beautifully recorded flute decades ago,
but now that same beautifully recorded flute sounds even more natural/real/live. "Voiced correctly
is a relative term, they both sound natural, but one is more natural than the other. A slight veil has
been lifted. The harmonics are just a bit more accurate/natural when compared to a live flute.

4. Not better or worse, just different? Same assumption as at the beginning of your comments.
Interestingly, there is actually a 10A line  preamplifier in the classified forum here for sale on Ebay. It has
been years since I have seen an ad. An 11A ad is virtually never. I believe the AR3, Ultra-verve preampliers
are in such a class. Why are some components coveted more than others?

I think we can agree that we both like live music.

cheers

steve
3
Bipolar System Disorders / Re: what’s your philosophy of voicing a system?
« Last post by GDHAL on December 07, 2022, 04:45:26 PM »
Beyond one's own hearing acuity, I think a valid argument can be made that no microphone is "exactly perfect". So, it follows that the expectation level of playing back sound(s) that have been recorded can also never be exactly perfect, no matter the room, speaker, electronics or anything else. Yes, the pursuit of audio nirvana is very alluring, especially when you love music.

The only truth is music….Music blends with the heartbeat universe and we forget the brain beat. - Jack Kerouac

To stay on point with this thread topic, I can tell when a system is voiced properly not just because of what my ears are transmitting to my brain, but by how/if my head is bobbing, my toes are tapping, or if I'm "moved" to dance and/or sing along.

At some point, "better" gear just doesn't do that. Only more music.

Many years ago I changed my listening habits, primarily because I'm the proverbial "deadhead". When I first started listening to Grateful Dead (80's) I couldn't understand what all the fuss over "different versions" of the same song, albeit performed on a different date and at a different venue, was all about. But at some point, it just "hit me". And as Bob Marley sings, this is the one good thing about music; when it hits you feel no pain.

So then I started "collecting" (90's) all Grateful Dead music I could get my hands (ears) on. Not long after listening to GD constantly, I realized that approximately half the songs they ever performed live, are cover songs (i.e. they are not the original composer). Then, I started listening to those artists, and my overall appreciation of music and artistic talent became greater and greater. Sure, like all of us, I started listening to music as a child. And many of those artists are still "with me" today, in mind, spirit, and on my hard drives! If I listen to song I  heard essentially in my infancy, like something from The Beatles, it's rather simple to know if my system - or someone else's - is "voiced" correctly.

These days I make it a point to always listen to something different. Hence this is one reason why I collect and listen to "live" music recordings. After I've listened to a studio album once, I just don't get the same enjoyment factor if I were to listen to it again. But that's just me.

Many audiophiles desire to constantly change their gear, or "something" about their system. I do not operate that way. Unless something is obviously wrong, I can stay content with my system for many years. Sure, I might tweak something here or there, but the dominant variable is the music itself.

Changing gear doesn't necessarily make anything sound better. More often than not it boils down to "different", not "better" or "worse".

Well, the aforementioned is my philosophy anyway.

Best.

Hal
4
Bipolar System Disorders / Re: what’s your philosophy of voicing a system?
« Last post by steve on December 07, 2022, 03:21:30 PM »
My first concern since sometime in the 1980s, has been the preservation of the dynamic life of the music. This seems to be the first casualty of the reproduction process. The second appears to be tonal errors.
 Many things appear to be implicated in the loss dynamic life. Gain stage design in amplifiers, pre and power amps as well as the total number of passive parts in a loudspeaker crossover are a couple of factors.
 Once I had a handle on this aspect of music reproduction, transparency and preservation
of as much of the detail captured in the original recording as possible became an additional part of the
picture.
 One might describe this approach to system optimization as voicing
but am not sure that I would. Neutrality and faithfulness to the source in all aspects
of reproduction are my goals. How successful I been in this endeavor is really a
personal value judgment and how someone else might experience the results of my
approach maybe quite variable.
At this point in time I can say that I have reached a stopping point.
Scoty

+1.  I like the way you think Scoty.

cheers

steve
5
Music Discussion / Re: New Album out for 2022 - "This and That"
« Last post by ejk on December 07, 2022, 02:59:05 PM »
Gave it a listen. While not my type of music I thought it was well done. I think you may have to protect yourself from some copyright infringements because the 2nd track beginning Sous Le Ciel de Paris kinda sounds like Led Zeps " All of My Love". Just sayin  :thumb: but don't worry I will testify you wrote it first
6
Bipolar System Disorders / Re: what’s your philosophy of voicing a system?
« Last post by _Scotty_ on December 07, 2022, 02:28:57 PM »
My first concern since sometime in the 1980s, has been the preservation of the dynamic life of the music. This seems to be the first casualty of the reproduction process. The second appears to be tonal errors.
 Many things appear to be implicated in the loss dynamic life. Gain stage design in amplifiers, pre and power amps as well as the total number of passive parts in a loudspeaker crossover are a couple of factors.
 Once I had a handle on this aspect of music reproduction, transparency and preservation
of as much of the detail captured in the original recording as possible became an additional part of the
picture.
 One might describe this approach to system optimization as voicing
but am not sure that I would. Neutrality and faithfulness to the source in all aspects
of reproduction are my goals. How successful I been in this endeavor is really a
personal value judgment and how someone else might experience the results of my
approach maybe quite variable.
At this point in time I can say that I have reached a stopping point.
Scotty
Sent from an Android phone with thumbs. Why can't Scotty spell?  geez I wonder?
7
Music Discussion / Re: New Album out for 2022 - "This and That"
« Last post by GDHAL on December 07, 2022, 01:31:57 PM »
I release the songs I recorded as a solo artist this past year. It's on Bandcamp as a free download, or just a listen. My 2020 and 2021 albums are there also.

If you like what you hear please let me know.

https://bobmcneice.bandcamp.com/

This is very kind of you, Bob. I shall have a listen.

We were right, we were giving, that's how we kept what we gave away - Comes a Time - Neil Young
8
Pete, how timely in that TWL is getting some more kudos from this very recent audiogon post. I've read other audiogon posts too with favorable TWL words.

https://forum.audiogon.com/discussions/advice-for-rca-interconnect-upgrade

I'd add to the agon thread myself, except I've been banned from that forum so I can't.

 :lol: :D :D :rofl: :thumb: :) :roll: 8)
You are not alone here- this place is like the French Foreign Legion of audiophiles…
Indeed it is, and a good place this is, too!   :thumb:
9
Music Discussion / Re: Sharing Top Notch, Reference Music Links.....
« Last post by Nick B on December 07, 2022, 10:19:44 AM »
Comfortably Numb as if played by Dire Straits

https://youtu.be/oTk5JrnS6_g

👍  nice…
10
Congrats Pete, your cables deserve all the accolades and so do you!
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10