Author Topic: Speaker Set Up  (Read 1487 times)

Offline doug s.

  • Obsessively Audiophilic
  • ****
  • Posts: 807
Re: Speaker Set Up
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2022, 11:41:34 AM »
hi hal,

the listener should still have the listening position centered between the speakers.  ie: if the speakers are 6" off the centerline of the room, the listening position should be as well.  typically doing this will make positive improvements of room nodes, as equidistant room boundaries tend to reinforce nodes; changing the distances eliminates that.

and toe-in should be adjusted to taste.  i'd start with mfr recommendations for the speakers.  i've happened to find that toeing in so the intersection point is a little bit in front of the listening position works well, but others have difference preferences and experiences; i think experimenting is key. years ago, i had a pair of thiel 3.5's, and they sounded great facing almost straight ahead.

doug s.
re: what charlie said about distance to side walls, i've found that in smaller rooms a slight difference in dimension from speaker to sidewall gives good results, as it tends to reduce room node issues.  ie: instead of having the center of each driver 2.5' from each side wall, have one 2.25' away, and the other 2.75' away.  it's worth experimenting.

and, re: better stands, the sound anchor stands are excellent, imo.

doug s.


Hi Doug. Your assertion (quoted above) is interesting. I can understand how that half foot or so could affect room node issues. Positively or negatively I wouldn't know as I have never tried that.

So let me ask you, would that speaker arrangement that you're suggesting be with the same toe in towards the listener (or not the same toe in)? Where is the PLP in that configuration?

Best

Hal
« Last Edit: December 21, 2022, 11:43:26 AM by doug s. »

Offline GDHAL

  • Obsessively Audiophilic
  • ****
  • Posts: 314
  • All we need is music, sweet music
Re: Speaker Set Up
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2022, 12:24:22 PM »
Thank you, Doug. Very appreciative of your insight (and rather prompt reply to my post too for that matter).

In my particular case, I wouldn't sit anywhere except dead center to the room, for aesthetic reasons (plus in my case I have a video setup which is part of the audio setup). Also in my case, my speakers weigh over 100 pounds each, so repositioning them even a half foot really does become a big deal.

And your point about toe in/out (or straight) is also true. In my case, I found that the intersection axis point of the speaker setup is best when it's about 4 inches behind my head. Hence my speaker arrangement is technically an isosceles triangle as opposed to an equilateral. The arrangement that I have follows Sandy Gross's setup tips,  plus my own experimentation when I initially did the setup, as well as what certain other audiophiles do.

However, I have what I call a "secondary primary listening position" (I know, an oxymoron), where I can set up a bar stool chair (and the eggnog is flowing right now) basically a foot and a half behind my primary listening position. That puts the listener about 6 to 12 inches *behind* the speaker axis convergence point.

I've listened from both front and behind-axis convergence positions and prefer to be inside (front) of the axis as opposed to being outside (behind) of it. However, I do understand how this is strictly a matter of preference and not "better" or "worse" per se.

I'll add that in general, I think (and again this is only my thinking) that most audiophiles have a *near-field* listening situation, even though they think that they don't. And I know what "near field" means (based on dozens of google articles, other reading references, Paul McGowan, etc.). If one stays within the concept of the near field having to do with more speakers, and less of the room itself, I believe sitting inside the speaker axis convergence helps achieve that. Conversely, when a person sits outside of the speaker axis convergence point, I believe the sound now starts to become far-field, essentially inviting more room interaction. Besides that, near-field allows one to play at a louder SPL without disturbing others. The aforementioned is only my opinion. I have no scientific data to back any of that up. Just my own personal experience having listened to many (40?) different systems in many different rooms.

EDIT: I have to get out of the habit of making posts from my cell phone while on the road as opposed to sitting down at my desktop computer.  :lol:

EDIT 2: I'm home and made this edit 6 PM EST on 12/21/22. Hopefully my last edit to this post!  :lol:
« Last Edit: December 21, 2022, 02:59:22 PM by GDHAL »
GoldenEar Triton Reference (pair), Musical Fidelity M6si, Schiit Yggdrasil-OG-B, Oppo UDP-205, Emotiva ERC-3, LG OLED65C9PUA, Salamander Synergy Triple Unit SL20, Audeze LCD-X, GIK acoustic paneling
http://halr.x10.mx/other.html

Offline GDHAL

  • Obsessively Audiophilic
  • ****
  • Posts: 314
  • All we need is music, sweet music
Re: Speaker Set Up
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2022, 06:07:10 PM »
An excerpt from Bob Harley on speaker placement. It's a quick read.

https://www.theabsolutesound.com/articles/optimizing-the-soundstage-with-speaker-placement
GoldenEar Triton Reference (pair), Musical Fidelity M6si, Schiit Yggdrasil-OG-B, Oppo UDP-205, Emotiva ERC-3, LG OLED65C9PUA, Salamander Synergy Triple Unit SL20, Audeze LCD-X, GIK acoustic paneling
http://halr.x10.mx/other.html