Author Topic: Graphene...  (Read 1917 times)

Offline TomS

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2018, 07:16:36 AM »
Recent article from Purdue Research:

Is tellurene the new graphene?

“The chiral-chain van der Waals structure of tellurene gives rise to strong in-plane anisotropic properties and large thickness-dependent shifts in Raman vibrational modes, which is not observed in other 2D layered materials.”

"Contrary to what you may think, this fragment was not written by AI, but by real researchers from Purdue University (USA) who have come up with a new material to make faster transistors with.

Tellurene is a two-dimensional crystal created from the rare element tellurium. Its special property that makes it interesting for use in electronics is the fact that electrons and holes move faster in it than in other materials. This property may be exploited to create faster transistors or smaller transistors that can switch higher currents.

Other important properties of tellurene are its stability at room temperature and the fact that it can be produced quite easily. Other tellurene-like two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus and silicene, are either not stable at room temperature or production in high quantities is difficult.

Also, compared to other 2D materials, tellurene crystals or flakes tend to be larger meaning less barriers in a tellurene semiconductor allowing it to carry higher currents.

Although tellurium is pretty rare, according to the researchers this is not a problem because only very small quantities are required."

Source: Purdue University
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Offline Nick B

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2018, 09:20:09 AM »
Recent article from Purdue Research:

Is tellurene the new graphene?

“The chiral-chain van der Waals structure of tellurene gives rise to strong in-plane anisotropic properties and large thickness-dependent shifts in Raman vibrational modes, which is not observed in other 2D layered materials.”

"Contrary to what you may think, this fragment was not written by AI, but by real researchers from Purdue University (USA) who have come up with a new material to make faster transistors with.

Tellurene is a two-dimensional crystal created from the rare element tellurium. Its special property that makes it interesting for use in electronics is the fact that electrons and holes move faster in it than in other materials. This property may be exploited to create faster transistors or smaller transistors that can switch higher currents.

Other important properties of tellurene are its stability at room temperature and the fact that it can be produced quite easily. Other tellurene-like two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus and silicene, are either not stable at room temperature or production in high quantities is difficult.

Also, compared to other 2D materials, tellurene crystals or flakes tend to be larger meaning less barriers in a tellurene semiconductor allowing it to carry higher currents.

Although tellurium is pretty rare, according to the researchers this is not a problem because only very small quantities are required."

Source: Purdue University

Interesting stuff....and the technology continues to develop. Maybe a new application indeed for audio. Makes me wonder if it would be able to be applied over a graphene treated substance.
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Offline P.I.

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #32 on: June 15, 2018, 05:57:47 PM »
Charles, has anyone other than Dave tried out the Graphene? Have you gotten any other feed back?

  Yes that is why no samples were returned to me. Quieter, improved focus and imaging, larger sound stage. One gets all the good things associated with a solid connection.



charles

Still waiting on my sample...  :duh
I'll send you one of my new versions, Pete.
OK.  I got my order today.  I’ll be sending you one next week.  A hand polished 5362A is already pretty special.  I look forward to your assessment.
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Offline P.I.

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #33 on: June 18, 2018, 08:17:08 PM »
I just received 2 graphene samples from a cool guy that is wanting to help me in developing treatment products.  The testing begins at the end of this week.  Gonna be very interesting  :thumb:
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Offline tmazz

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #34 on: June 19, 2018, 12:36:11 PM »
I just received 2 graphene samples from a cool guy that is wanting to help me in developing treatment products.  The testing begins at the end of this week.  Gonna be very interesting  :thumb:


Game on!  :)
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Offline P.I.

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #35 on: June 20, 2018, 06:16:32 PM »
I just received 2 graphene samples from a cool guy that is wanting to help me in developing treatment products.  The testing begins at the end of this week.  Gonna be very interesting.  I’ve been doing a lot of research concerning carrier liquids and diluents.  The results are very good so far.  More, later!

Cool, so far.
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Offline P.I.

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #36 on: June 23, 2018, 09:23:22 PM »
I have been revisiting chemistry for about the last 2 months.  Of course the object of my curiosity has been a reasonable application of and for graphene for all electrical applications in audio.  During this research I came across what I believe to be a superior contact enhancer for any audio context.  It combines several different chemical elements to offer the attributes of Craig products along with Jena Labs fluids.  It is safe for use on plastics and a tiny amount goes a very long way in both cleaning and enhancement of conductivity between surfaces.

I will be ready to supply the contact treatment at the end of next week.  A bottle capable of providing hundreds treatments will be $15.00 plus shipping ($4.00) via First Class Mail.  It will come with 6 small applicators so you can’t overuse it.  That is the biggest problem with spray application and why DeOxit is 90% volatile diluents.  Still, people tend to think that if a little is good, a lot is better.  Nothing could be farther from the truth.  Using just barely enough of any contact treatment is what we want to do.  So many “contact treatments” migrate and attract ionic particulates, smoke, dust, skin cells... etc.

I really do believe that this is the best contact treatment available that I have used to date.  I like it, several other beta dudes do, too.  As always a full money back guarantee applies to all purchases.

Let me know if you are interested and I will hook you up.

I am still working on the final formulation and pricing on the graphene treatment.  Mostly I am trying to get the final cost within what I consider to be reasonable limits.

This has been an interesting couple of months learning and relearning all of those things I learned in organic chemistry hundreds of years ago.  Kind of like alchemy...
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 09:59:02 PM by P.I. »
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Offline Nick B

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #37 on: June 23, 2018, 11:20:36 PM »
I have been revisiting chemistry for about the last 2 months.  Of course the object of my curiosity has been a reasonable application of and for graphene for all electrical applications in audio.  During this research I came across what I believe to be a superior contact enhancer for any audio context.  It combines several different chemical elements to offer the attributes of Craig products along with Jena Labs fluids.  It is safe for use on plastics and a tiny amount goes a very long way in both cleaning and enhancement of conductivity between surfaces.

I will be ready to supply the contact treatment at the end of next week.  A bottle capable of providing hundreds treatments will be $15.00 plus shipping ($4.00) via First Class Mail.  It will come with 6 small applicators so you can’t overuse it.  That is the biggest problem with spray application and why DeOxit is 90% volatile diluents.  Still, people tend to think that if a little is good, a lot is better.  Nothing could be farther from the truth.  Using just barely enough of any contact treatment is what we want to do.  So many “contact treatments” migrate and attract ionic particulates, smoke, dust, skin cells... etc.

I really do believe that this is the best contact treatment available that I have used to date.  I like it, several other beta dudes do, too.  As always a full money back guarantee applies to all purchases.

Let me know if you are interested and I will hook you up.

I am still working on the final formulation and pricing on the graphene treatment.  Mostly I am trying to get the final cost within what I consider to be reasonable limits.

This has been an interesting couple of months learning and relearning all of those things I learned in organic chemistry hundreds of years ago.  Kind of like alchemy...

Dave,
Does this new product need to be reapplied every 6 months to a year or is it much longer lasting?
Nick
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Offline P.I.

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2018, 10:35:08 AM »
I have been revisiting chemistry for about the last 2 months.  Of course the object of my curiosity has been a reasonable application of and for graphene for all electrical applications in audio.  During this research I came across what I believe to be a superior contact enhancer for any audio context.  It combines several different chemical elements to offer the attributes of Craig products along with Jena Labs fluids.  It is safe for use on plastics and a tiny amount goes a very long way in both cleaning and enhancement of conductivity between surfaces.

I will be ready to supply the contact treatment at the end of next week.  A bottle capable of providing hundreds treatments will be $15.00 plus shipping ($4.00) via First Class Mail.  It will come with 6 small applicators so you can’t overuse it.  That is the biggest problem with spray application and why DeOxit is 90% volatile diluents.  Still, people tend to think that if a little is good, a lot is better.  Nothing could be farther from the truth.  Using just barely enough of any contact treatment is what we want to do.  So many “contact treatments” migrate and attract ionic particulates, smoke, dust, skin cells... etc.

I really do believe that this is the best contact treatment available that I have used to date.  I like it, several other beta dudes do, too.  As always a full money back guarantee applies to all purchases.

Let me know if you are interested and I will hook you up.

I am still working on the final formulation and pricing on the graphene treatment.  Mostly I am trying to get the final cost within what I consider to be reasonable limits.

This has been an interesting couple of months learning and relearning all of those things I learned in organic chemistry hundreds of years ago.  Kind of like alchemy...

Dave,
Does this new product need to be reapplied every 6 months to a year or is it much longer lasting?
Nick
Nick, it will be longer lasting than the treatments that I know of, but connections should be cleaned at least every 6 months or so anyway.  Any time there is a mechanical connection that carries voltage there will be attraction of ions to that connection.  Like I said above, microscopic ions will get into the connection.  That’s why contact cleaners have to be used in the first place.  There are over one million particles .3 microns or larger in a cubic foot of air.  Every one of them has an electrical potential.  They are what build up on electrical contacts and create the nasty schmutz that cause conductivity problems.
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Offline P.I.

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #39 on: June 25, 2018, 11:48:40 AM »
Recent article from Purdue Research:

Is tellurene the new graphene?

“The chiral-chain van der Waals structure of tellurene gives rise to strong in-plane anisotropic properties and large thickness-dependent shifts in Raman vibrational modes, which is not observed in other 2D layered materials.”

"Contrary to what you may think, this fragment was not written by AI, but by real researchers from Purdue University (USA) who have come up with a new material to make faster transistors with.

Tellurene is a two-dimensional crystal created from the rare element tellurium. Its special property that makes it interesting for use in electronics is the fact that electrons and holes move faster in it than in other materials. This property may be exploited to create faster transistors or smaller transistors that can switch higher currents.

Other important properties of tellurene are its stability at room temperature and the fact that it can be produced quite easily. Other tellurene-like two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus and silicene, are either not stable at room temperature or production in high quantities is difficult.

Also, compared to other 2D materials, tellurene crystals or flakes tend to be larger meaning less barriers in a tellurene semiconductor allowing it to carry higher currents.

Although tellurium is pretty rare, according to the researchers this is not a problem because only very small quantities are required."

Source: Purdue University
Tom, when you posted this it piqued my interest so I started doing some research.  Some of the experimental recipes that we used at Philips Semiconductor utilized dimethyl telluride in epitaxy and I remember it as producing a really folder.  I don't think we used it is implant... can't remember  Too much inside baseball, sorry.

I think that any audioapplications will be limited to tellurium copper , at least for the near future, but I've been out of the semi industry for some years and don't know where it is headed there.

I'm busy enough with the graphene research I'm doing. Yikes! 
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Offline TomS

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #40 on: June 25, 2018, 11:54:06 AM »
Recent article from Purdue Research:

Is tellurene the new graphene?

“The chiral-chain van der Waals structure of tellurene gives rise to strong in-plane anisotropic properties and large thickness-dependent shifts in Raman vibrational modes, which is not observed in other 2D layered materials.”

"Contrary to what you may think, this fragment was not written by AI, but by real researchers from Purdue University (USA) who have come up with a new material to make faster transistors with.

Tellurene is a two-dimensional crystal created from the rare element tellurium. Its special property that makes it interesting for use in electronics is the fact that electrons and holes move faster in it than in other materials. This property may be exploited to create faster transistors or smaller transistors that can switch higher currents.

Other important properties of tellurene are its stability at room temperature and the fact that it can be produced quite easily. Other tellurene-like two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus and silicene, are either not stable at room temperature or production in high quantities is difficult.

Also, compared to other 2D materials, tellurene crystals or flakes tend to be larger meaning less barriers in a tellurene semiconductor allowing it to carry higher currents.

Although tellurium is pretty rare, according to the researchers this is not a problem because only very small quantities are required."

Source: Purdue University
Tom, when you posted this it piqued my interest so I started doing some research.  Some of the experimental recipes that we used at Philips Semiconductor utilized dimethyl telluride in epitaxy and I remember it as producing a really folder.  I don't think we used it is implant... can't remember  Too much inside baseball, sorry.

I think that any audioapplications will be limited to tellurium copper , at least for the near future, but I've been out of the semi industry for some years and don't know where it is headed there.

I'm busy enough with the graphene research I'm doing. Yikes!
Yes, for semi's it's all about smaller geometry and lower power, Gordon Moore et al ...
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Offline P.I.

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Re: Graphene...
« Reply #41 on: June 25, 2018, 12:06:54 PM »

Yes, for semi's it's all about smaller geometry and lower power, Gordon Moore et al ...
My son-in-law Brian is with ASM and we were talking about all of this a couple of days ago.  They have a landscape/voltage/current density wall that they are up against in miniaturization that is proving to be a formidable task.

Quantum computers?  Biological (virus) computing?  Who knows?
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