Author Topic: Cleaning cd's before adding them to your hard drive  (Read 2329 times)

Offline Bill O'Connell

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Cleaning cd's before adding them to your hard drive
« on: January 20, 2007, 06:17:57 PM »
Has anybody noticed a difference in sound when downloading your cd's if they are clean or not. Does it make sense to clean them before adding to the computer?  Just curious if it matters or not.

 Thanks,
Bill
Bill O'Connell,
Morningstar Audio/Eastern Electric distributor for North America
847-255-1150
"If your playing more than 3 chords your just showing off"  John Lee Hooker

Offline John A. Casler

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Re: Cleaning cd's before adding them to your hard drive
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2007, 07:09:07 PM »
Quote from: "Bill O'Connell"
Has anybody noticed a difference in sound when downloading your cd's if they are clean or not. Does it make sense to clean them before adding to the computer?  Just curious if it matters or not.

 Thanks,
Bill

Hi Bill,

I didn't clean mine, but I did run each and every one through the Bedini Clarifier before importing. :wink:
John Casler
 
VMPS LA CA USA/SUMMIT Audio Video
310-446-0138
888-202-3126 (order desk)
JCasler@VMPSaudio.com

Offline Carlman

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Cleaning cd's before adding them to your hard drive
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2007, 07:42:13 AM »
Bill, the big difference is in speed.  The hardware/software works hard to ensure the process is bit-perfect... So, if there is dust/smudges, it just takes it longer to assemble the bits correctly and put them on your hard drive.

-C
I really enjoy listening to music.

Offline Dougie085

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Re: Cleaning cd's before adding them to your hard drive
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2008, 05:28:10 PM »
I was going to say one of the reasons ripping your music is better is because your CD rom drive uses bit correcting stuff where as CD players do not. You can still get some errors though. I use EAC with Accurate Rip or something like that. It has a database online of nearly every cd you can think of and the ideal way the CD should look as far as the bits go. And it uses what it sees and whats listed online to combine together to give you the best possible rip. If your doing something like this then how clean the cd is shouldn't matter to much.